AUTISM

AUTISM

June 13, 2012

Hormones, Elvis, and human emotion: Shedding light on what makes people feel and act the way they do

Full story: MedicalXpress

The velvety voice of Elvis Presley still makes hearts flutter—and in a new study with people who have the rare genetic disorder Williams syndrome, one of the King's classics is among a group of songs that helped to cast light on part of the essence of being human: the mystery of emotion and human interaction.

In a study led by Julie R. Korenberg, Ph.D., M.D., University of Utah/USTAR professor, Circuits of the Brain and pediatrics, people with and without Williams syndrome (WS) listened to music in a trial to gauge emotional response through the release of oxytocin and arginine vasopressin (AVP), two hormones associated with emotion. The study, published June 12, 2012, in PLoS ONE, signals a paradigm shift both for understanding human emotional and behavioral systems and expediting the treatments of devastating illnesses such as WS, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and possibly even autism, according to Korenberg, senior author on the study and one of the world's leading experts in genetics, brain, and behavior of WS.

"Our results could be very important for guiding the treatment of these disorders," Korenberg says. "It could have enormous implications for personal the use of drugs to help people."

The study also is the first to reveal new genes that control emotional responses and to show that AVP is involved in...

Journal reference: PLoS ONE
Provided by University of Utah Health Sciences


Image above: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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